The Candy Crush Conundrum - WRBL

The Candy Crush Conundrum

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GREENVILLE, N.C. -

If you have been on Facebook within the past month then you will have heard of the new game sensation "Candy Crush Saga"

The iPhone app version of the game is currently number three in the Apple App Store, and there aren't just a few of your friends playing it. There are probably a high percentage of your friends playing it.

So what is behind the success of the game? Outside of the addictive game play, the game takes advantage of a player's social network. To continue on to advance levels players must send request for friends to help them. This leads to the game ‘crowdsourcing' the player's social network, and also leads to a large amount of free advertising for the game. Players have to pay to advance without the help of friends.

When players link the game to their Facebook account they give it permission to post to Facebook on their behalf. This is why you see so many posts from your friends about how they have beaten the latest level, or how they have sent extra lives to friends.

What can you do if you don't want to fill your friend's newsfeeds with the latest news from your Candy Crunch adventure? You can edit your settings and remove the application's privilege to post on your behalf. The app will ask you later to post on your behalf, but it will give you options for who can see those posts. Change the setting to ‘only me' and that will help keep post from flooding your friend's newsfeeds.

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