Researchers find some imported fish contains cancer-causing chem - WRBL

Researchers find some imported fish contains cancer-causing chemical

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Using their poison detector, research with Appealing Products, on N.C. State's Centennial Campus, found fish imported from China was contaminated with formaldehyde. Using their poison detector, research with Appealing Products, on N.C. State's Centennial Campus, found fish imported from China was contaminated with formaldehyde.
RALEIGH, N.C. -

Researchers in Raleigh say the Food and Drug Administration needs to better test food that is being consumed regularly in the U.S.

Using their poison detector, research with Appealing Products, on N.C. State's Centennial Campus, found fish imported from China was contaminated with formaldehyde. The fish was purchased from three different chains of grocery stores in Raleigh.

"A regular person should not consume this piece of fish," said researcher Jason Morton, who, along with Dr. A.J. Attar, invented the poison detector.

The poison detector that was developed by Appealing Products is an adaptation of the method recommended by the EPA, OSHA and the FDA for the analysis of formaldehyde, a banned toxic substance.

The researchers say they randomly tested fish from the U.S. and other countries. All were negative except 25 percent of the imported fish from China and Vietnam tested positive for formaldehyde.

"It can cause mutations that can lead to cancer [and] can cause birth defects," said researcher Ian Wright.

But formaldehyde is also a powerful preservative.

"Instead of fish spoiling in two to three days, it will last several weeks," Attar explained.

Attar said Appealing Products' attorneys have the company withholding where the researchers purchased the fish, and will only allow them to disclose that the grocers are located in Raleigh.

The FDA does not check imported foods for the presence of formaldehyde, which the human body can tolerate in small amounts. Less than 4 percent of all of the food imported into the U.S. is inspected by the FDA and less than 2 percent of imported perishable food is inspected, Appealing Products said.

Appealing Products said its system is a low cost, fast detector of the poison, and researchers said consumers should put pressure on the FDA to better test food coming into the country.

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