DC Navy Yard shooter was reservist until 2011 - WRBL

DC Navy Yard shooter was reservist until 2011

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Officials say the gunman has been identified as 34-year-old Aaron Alexis. Officials say the gunman has been identified as 34-year-old Aaron Alexis.
The FBI is asking the public to come forward with any information about this man. If you have any information call 1-800-call-FBI. The FBI is asking the public to come forward with any information about this man. If you have any information call 1-800-call-FBI.
(AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin). Police work the scene on M Street, SE in Washington, where a gunman was reported at the Washington Navy Yard in Washington, on Monday, Sept. 16, 2013. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin). Police work the scene on M Street, SE in Washington, where a gunman was reported at the Washington Navy Yard in Washington, on Monday, Sept. 16, 2013.

Some biographical information on the shooter: 

By The Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) - Aaron Alexis, a 34-year-old former Navy reservist, was identified by the FBI on Monday as the gunman responsible for a mass shooting at the Washington Navy Yard in which 13 people died, including Alexis. Here are some biographical details on Alexis:

NAME: Aaron Alexis.

AGE: 34 (born May 9, 1979).

HOMETOWN: New York City.

LAST RESIDENCE: Fort Worth, Texas.

OCCUPATION: Navy reservist from 2007-2011; left as a petty officer 3rd class, stationed in Fort Worth. After discharge, worked as a waiter and delivery driver at the Happy Bowl Thai restaurant in White Settlement, a suburb of Fort Worth, until May 2013.

EDUCATION: Was pursuing a bachelor's degree in aeronautics via online classes at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University.

RELIGION: Converted to Buddhism, according to friends.

ARREST RECORD: In September 2010, Alexis was arrested on suspicion of discharging a firearm within city limits after a neighbor reported she was nearly shot by a bullet fired from his downstairs apartment. He told police his gun accidentally discharged while he was cleaning it, and no charges were filed. In May 2004, he was arrested in Seattle for shooting out the tires of another man's vehicle in what he later described to detectives as an anger-fueled "blackout."

"He was a very nice person," said Afton Bradley, a former co-worker at the Thai restaurant. "It kind of blows my mind away."

 


 

By ERIC TUCKER, BRETT ZONGKER and LOLITA C. BALDOR
Associated Press

WASHINGTON (CBS/AP) - The Navy says a gunman who opened fire inside a building at the Washington Navy Yard was a full-time reservist from 2007 to 2011.

The Navy said in a release Monday that 34-year-old Aaron Alexis, of Texas, left the Navy on Jan. 31, 2011, as a petty officer 3rd class. It's not immediately clear why he left.

Alexis had been working for the fleet logistics support squadron No. 46, in Fort Worth, Texas. The Navy says his home of record was New York City.

While Alexis' motive is still not clear, officials said he is a former avionics electrician with the U.S. Navy. He had been arrested at least twice previously: once in Seattle for malicious mischief, and once in Fort Worth in 2010 for discharging a firearm in public. He has lived in New York City also.

Alexis was carrying an ID card belonging to Rollie Chance, who was placed on administrative leave last October. Chance told officials he does not know Alexis.

Alexis was one of 13 people killed during the rampage.

 


Mayor: 13 dead, including gunman, at Navy Yard

WASHINGTON (AP) - The D.C. mayor says 13 people have died in the shooting rampage, including the gunman.

 

Mayor Vincent Gray said at a news conference Monday afternoon that the shooter was among the dead. Officials say the gunman has been identified as 34-year-old Aaron Alexis.

Earlier in the day, authorities had been looking for two other people who may have been involved in the shooting. One of those people has been identified and ruled out as a suspect.

However, Gray says investigators are still searching for a third individual wearing an olive-green, military-style uniform to determine if he was involved.

 Gray says a motive has not yet been determined.


Officials: Navy Yard shooter ID'ed as Aaron Alexis

WASHINGTON (AP) - Federal law enforcement officials say the man accused in a shooting rampage at the Washington Navy Yard that left at least 12 people dead has been identified as Aaron Alexis. 

The two officials spoke Monday to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak publicly. 

One of those officials says Alexis was a 34-year-old from Texas. He is believed to have a criminal record there and to be a holder of a concealed carry weapon permit. 

That official says Alexis is believed to have gotten into the Navy Yard by using someone else's identification card. It is not yet clear if that individual was an accomplice or if that person's ID card was stolen.


Previous story: 

12 killed in Navy Yard shooting; One suspect cleared 

WASHINGTON (AP) - Police say a man in a tan, military-style outfit who had been sought in connection with the shooting rampage at the Washington Navy Yard has been identified and is not a suspect or a person of interest in the slayings.

The D.C. Police Department said in a tweet Monday that the man has been identified and is not believed to be a gunman or otherwise involved in the shootings that left 12 dead.

One gunman is dead.

Chief Cathy Lanier had said earlier in the day that police were searching for two other people wearing military-style uniforms. It wasn't known if those two people were actually military employees.


Previous Story: 


WASHINGTON (AP) - As many as three gunmen opened fire Monday inside the Washington Navy Yard, attacking office workers at a heavily guarded military facility in the heart of the nation's capital. At least 12 people were killed.

One of the gunmen was dead, and police were searching for two other men believed to have joined in the attack less than 4 miles from the White House. The suspects were reportedly disguised in military-style clothing, including one carrying a handgun and wearing a tan Navy-style uniform and a beret, D.C. police chief Cathy Lanier said. The other was said to carrying a long gun, wearing olive green garb.

"The big concern for us right now is, we potentially have two other shooters that we have not located," Lanier said.

It was not immediately clear whether the number of dead included a gunman.

The attack unfolded less than 4 miles from the White House at a former shipyard that is one of the Navy's oldest shore facilities.

The area that was targeted, known as Building 197, was part of the military's headquarters for Naval Sea Systems Command, which buys, builds and maintains ships, submarines and combat systems. About 3,000 people work at the headquarters, many of them civilians.

Witnesses described a gunman opening fire from a fourth-floor overlook, aiming down on people in the first-floor cafeteria. Others said a gunman fired at them in a third-floor hallway.

It was not clear whether the witnesses on different floors were describing the same gunman.

As emergency vehicles and law enforcement officers flooded streets around the complex, a helicopter hovered overhead, nearby schools were locked down and airplanes at nearby Reagan National Airport were briefly grounded so they would not interfere with law-enforcement choppers. A short distance away, security was beefed up at the Capitol and other federal buildings, but officials said there was no known threat.

President Barack Obama mourned yet another mass shooting in the U.S. that he said took the lives of American patriots. Obama promised to make sure "whoever carried out this cowardly act is held responsible."

Todd Brundidge, an executive assistant with Navy Sea Systems Command, said he and other co-workers encountered a gunman in a long hallway on the third floor. The gunman was wearing all blue, he said.

"He just turned and started firing," Brundidge said.

Terrie Durham, an executive assistant with the same agency, said she also saw the gunman firing toward her and Brundidge.

"He aimed high and missed," she said. "He said nothing. As soon as I realized he was shooting, we just said, 'Get out of the building.'"

Rick Mason, a civilian program-management analyst for the Navy, said a gunman was shooting from the overlook in the hallway outside his office.

Shortly after the gunfire, Mason said, someone on an overhead speaker told workers to seek shelter and later to head for the gates at the complex.

Patricia Ward, a logistics-management specialist, said she was in the cafeteria getting breakfast.

"It was three gunshots straight in a row - pop, pop, pop. Three seconds later, it was pop, pop, pop, pop, pop, so it was like about a total of seven gunshots, and we just started running," Ward told reporters several blocks away from the Navy Yard.

Ward said security officers started directing people out of the building with guns drawn.

One person died at George Washington University Hospital of a single gunshot wound to the left temple, said Dr. Babak Sarani, director of trauma and acute care surgery. A police officer and two civilian women were in critical condition at Washington Hospital Center, said Janis Orlowski, the hospital's chief operating officer.

Orlowski said the police officer was in the operating room with gunshot wounds to the legs. The police chief said he was wounded when he engaged the shooter. It wasn't clear if he shot at the gunman.

One woman had a gunshot wound to the shoulder. The other had gunshot wounds to the head and hand.

Anxious relatives and friends of those who work at the complex waited to hear from loved ones.

Tech Sgt. David Reyes, who works at Andrews Air Force Base, said he was waiting to pick up his wife, Dina, who was under lockdown in a building next to where the shooting happened. She sent him a text message about being on lockdown.

"They are under lockdown because they just don't know," Reyes said. "They have to check every building in there, and they have to check every room and just, of course, a lot of rooms and a lot of buildings."

Naval Sea Systems Command is the largest of the Navy's five system commands and accounts for a quarter of the Navy's entire budget. Only security personnel were allowed to be armed on the campus.

Mason, the program management analyst for the Navy, said there are multiple levels of security to reach his office where he heard gunfire. Everyone must show their building IDs to get through a main gate, and at the building entrance, everyone must swipe their badges to pass through either a door or gate, depending on the entrance.

That "makes me think it might have been someone who works here," he said.

The Navy Yard has three gates, according to its website. One is open around the clock and must be used by visitors. A second gate is only for military and civilian Defense Department employees. The other gate is for bus traffic.

The Navy Yard is part of a fast-growing neighborhood on the banks of the Anacostia River in southeast Washington, just blocks from the Nationals Park baseball stadium.

___

Associated Press writers Jesse Holland, Stacy A. Anderson, Brian Witte and Ben Nuckols in Washington contributed to this report.

Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Police: Man in tan outfit not Navy Yard suspect

Posted: Sep 16, 2013 10:32 AM EDTUpdated: Sep 16, 2013 3:05 PM EDT
 
(AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin). Police work the scene on M Street, SE in Washington, where a gunman was reported at the Washington Navy Yard in Washington, on Monday, Sept. 16, 2013.
(AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin). Police work the scene on M Street, SE in Washington, where a gunman was reported at the Washington Navy Yard in Washington, on Monday, Sept. 16, 2013.
By ERIC TUCKER, BRETT ZONGKER and LOLITA C. BALDOR
Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) - Police say a man in a tan, military-style outfit who had been sought in connection with the shooting rampage at the Washington Navy Yard has been identified and is not a suspect or a person of interest in the slayings.

The D.C. Police Department said in a tweet Monday that the man has been identified and is not believed to be a gunman or otherwise involved in the shootings that left 12 dead.

One gunman is dead.

Chief Cathy Lanier had said earlier in the day that police were searching for two other people wearing military-style uniforms. It wasn't known if those two people were actually military employees.

Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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