15 Tennesseans charged in January 6 U.S. Capitol riot

National

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (WATE) — A 66-year-old Knoxville man is the latest Tennessean charged in the January 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol. A total of 15 Tennesseans have either pleaded guilty or face multiple charges ranging from civil disorder to assaulting officers and obstruction.

Matthew Baggott
Photo: U.S. Justice Dept.

Federal agents arrested Baggott on May 30 in Murfreesboro, Tennessee. He pleaded not guilty to all counts at a June 25 arraignment. He was released on personal recognizance and a status conference has been set for August 31.

  • Federal agents arrested Baggott on May 30 in Murfreesboro, Tennessee.
  • Entering or Remaining in Restricted Building or Grounds Without Lawful Authority
  • Disorderly or Disruptive Conduct in Restricted Building or Grounds/Impeding Official Business
  • Violent Entry or Disorderly Conduct on Capitol Grounds
Matthew Bledsoe
Photo: U.S. Justice Dept.

Bledsoe was arrested on January 15 and first appeared in court on the same day. He was indicted on March 10 and pleaded not guilty to all counts two days later. He was released on personal recognizance with a status hearing set for Sept. 24.

  • Obstruction of an Official Proceeding and Aiding and Abetting
  • Entering and Remaining in a Restricted Building or Grounds
  • Disorderly and Disruptive Conduct in a Restricted Building or Grounds
  • Disorderly Conduct in a Capitol Building
  • Parading, Demonstrating, or Picketing in a Capitol Building
Nicholas Brockhoff

Law enforcement identified Brockhoff as the individual who sprayed officers with a fire extinguisher, causing them to disperse and obstructing their ability to see. Surveillance video showed him enter the Capitol building through a broken window and captured in several instances wearing a stolen police helmet.

Brockhoff was arrested in Counce, Tennessee on May 27. He first appeared in court on June 23. A status hearing has been set for August 24. Brockhoff remains jailed ahead of the hearing.

Photo: U.S. Justice Dept.
  • Assaulting, Resisting, or Impeding certain officers or employed in the performance of the duties
  • Use of a Deadly or Dangerous Weapon
  • Obstruction of Law Enforcement during Civil Disorder
  • Knowingly Entering or Remaining in any Restricted Building or Grounds without Lawful Authority
  • Disorderly and Disruptive Conduct in a Restricted Building or Grounds
  • Knowingly Engages in Act of Physical Violence in the Grounds or any of the Capitol Buildings
  • Parading, Demonstrating, or Picketing in a Capitol Building
Lisa Eisenhart

An arrest affidavit says Eisenhart and her son, Eric Munchel, agreed to enter the U.S. Capitol without lawful authority at the time when Congress was certifying the results of the 2020 presidential election. Eisenhart and Munchel knowingly and willfully joined a mob of individuals to forcibly enter the Capitol “with the intent to cause a civil disturbance designed to impede, disrupt and disturb the orderly conduct of business by the United States House of Representatives and the United States Senate.”

Lisa Eisenhart (Source: Federal Bureau of Investigation/U.S. Attorney’s Office & Metro Nashville Police Department)

She was arrested on January 16. She was arraigned on June 23 and pleaded guilty to all counts. A status conference has been set for Sept. 20. She was released on personal recognizance.

  • Obstruction of an Official Proceeding
  • Restricted Building or Grounds
  • Violent Entry or Disorderly Conduct
  • Aiding and Abetting
Jack Jesse Griffith
Photo: U.S. Justice Dept.

According to investigators, someone identified Griffith and shared posts from his Facebook account, where he used the name Juan Bibiano. Investigators said another post included a message where Griffith (Bibiano) said, “I even helped stormed [sic] the capitol today, but it only made things worse.”

Griffith was arrested on January 16 in Gallatin. He pleaded not guilty to all counts at a March 12 arraignment. Griffith later pleaded guilty to all counts in an agreement with the prosecution. A sentencing hearing has been set for October 15.

  • Obstruction of an Official Proceeding and Aiding and Abetting
  • Entering and Remaining in a Restricted Building or Grounds; Disorderly and Disruptive Conduct in a Restricted Building or Grounds
  • Disorderly Conduct in a Capitol Building
  • Parading, Demonstrating, or Picketing in a Capitol Building
Albuquerque Head

Head was arrested on April 14 in Johnson City, Tennessee. He remains jailed ahead of a status hearing on Sept. 28.

Albuquerque Cosper Head (Photos: FBI)
  • Obstruction of an Official Proceeding and Aiding and Abetting
  • Civil Disorder
  • Assaulting, Resisting, or Impeding Certain Officers
  • Entering and Remaining in a Restricted Building or Grounds
  • Disorderly and Disruptive Conduct in a Restricted Building or Grounds
  • Impeding Ingress and Egress in a Restricted Building or Grounds
  • Engaging in Physical Violence in a Restricted Building or Grounds
  • Impeding Passage Through the Capitol Grounds or Buildings
  • Acts of Physical Violence in the Capitol Grounds or Buildings
Bryan Ivey. Photo: U.S. Justice Dept.
Bryan Ivey

Ivey was arrested in Cookeville on March 4. After pleading not guilty in April, he later entered a guilty plea to all four counts. A sentencing date has been set for Sept. 28.

  • Entering and Remaining in a Restricted Building or Grounds
  • Disorderly and Disruptive Conduct in a Restricted Building or Grounds
  • Disorderly Conduct in a Capitol Building
  • Parading, Demonstrating, or Picketing in a Capitol Building
Clifford Meteer

Meteer was arrested in Knoxville on Aug. 10. He waived all preliminary readings at a federal court hearing in Knoxville on the same day and was released on his own recognizance. He is scheduled to appear on Aug. 17 in federal court in Washington, D.C.

  • Knowingly Entering or Remaining in any Restricted Building or Grounds Without Lawful Authority
  • Disorderly and Disruptive Conduct in a Restricted Building
  • Entering and Remaining on the Floor of Congress 
  • Parading, Demonstrating, or Picketing in a Capitol Building
Eric Munchel

Eric Munchel, who was photographed carrying flexible plastic handcuffs in the Senate chamber. Prosecutors say he and his mother, Lisa Eisenhart, wore tactical and bulletproof vests in the Capitol and Munchel carried a stun gun. He also recorded their storming of the Capitol and prosecutors say that video shows the pair stashed weapons in a bag before entering the building.

Munchel was arrested on January 10 in Nashville. He was ordered detained and transported to Washington D.C. two weeks later, pleading not guilty to all counts at a February 17 hearing. A superseding indictment was filed against Munchel and Lisa Eisenhart in June, to which he again pleaded not guilty. He was released on personal recognizance with a status hearing set for Sept. 20.

  • Obstruction of an Official Proceeding
  • Conspiracy to Commit Obstruction
  • Restricted Building or Grounds
  • Obstruction of an Official Proceeding and Aiding and Abetting
  • Violent Entry or Disorderly Conduct
  • Entering and Remaining in a Restricted Building or Grounds with a Deadly or Dangerous Weapon and Aiding and Abetting
  • Disorderly and Disruptive Conduct in a Restricted Building or Grounds with a Deadly or Dangerous Weapon and Aiding and Abetting
  • Unlawful Possession of a Dangerous Weapon on Capitol Grounds or Buildings and Aiding and Abetting
  • Entering and Remaining in the Gallery of Congress
  • Disorderly Conduct in a Capitol Building
  • Parading, Demonstrating, or Picketing in a Capitol Building
Parks, circled in red, pictured inside the Capitol with Matthew Baggott (circled in blue) Photo: U.S. Justice Dept.
Stewart Parks

Parks was arrested on June 3 in Columbia, Tennessee. He pleaded not guilty to all counts on June 25. He was released on personal recognizance ahead of a status hearing on Aug. 31.

  • Entering or Remaining in Restricted Building or Grounds Without Lawful Authority
  • Disorderly or Disruptive Conduct in Restricted Building or Grounds / Impeding Official Business
  • Violent Entry or Disorderly Conduct on Capitol Grounds
  • Theft of Government Property

Ronnie Presley

In one video post obtained by the FBI, the subject verbally identified himself as ‘Ronnie Presley’ ‘from Tennessee’. In one post from January 6, Presley speaks into the cell phone stating, “Do you see me? I am on the top step of the (expletive) Capitol!”. He was also recorded grabbing a police officer’s riot shield.

Presley was arrested on March 5 in Nashville. He was arraigned on April 5 and pleaded not guilty to all counts. He remains jailed ahead of a status hearing on Sept. 14.

  • Civil Disorder
  • Obstruction of an Official Proceeding and Aiding and Abetting
  • Entering and Remaining in a Restricted Building or Grounds
  • Disorderly and Disruptive Conduct in a Restricted Building or Grounds
  • Engaging in Physical Violence in a Restricted Building or Grounds
  • Violent Entry and Disorderly Conduct in a Capitol Building
  • Impeding Passage Through the Capitol Grounds or Buildings
  • Parading, Demonstrating, or Picketing in a Capitol Building
Blake Reed

Reed was arrested in Nashville on January 17. He pleaded not guilty to all counts on March 12. He was released on personal recognizance and a status hearing has been set for Sept. 24.

Reed (left) photographed inside the Capitol with Matthew Bledsoe. Photo: U.S. Justice Dept.
  • Obstruction of an Official Proceeding and Aiding and Abetting
  • Entering and Remaining in a Restricted Building or Grounds
  • Disorderly and Disruptive Conduct in a Restricted Building or Grounds
  • Disorderly Conduct in a Capitol Building
  • Parading, Demonstrating, or Picketing in a Capitol Building

Michael Roche

In a video captured by The New Yorker magazine, Roche is seen standing behind the Vice President’s desk in the Senate chamber of the capitol building.

Michael Roche, circled in red. Photo: U.S. Justice Dept.

Roche was arrested in Murfreesboro on April 13. He appeared in federal court in Middle Tennessee that same day and was released on conditions. A status hearing has been set for Aug. 24.

  • Knowingly Entering or Remaining in any Restricted Building or Grounds Without Lawful Authority
  • Disorderly and Disruptive Conduct in a Restricted Building or Grounds
  • Entering and Remaining on the Floor of Congress
  • Disorderly Conduct in a Capitol Building
  • Parading, Demonstrating, or Picketing in a Capitol Building

Photo: U.S. Justice Dept.
Michael Timbrook

Timbrook was arrested in Cookeville, Tennessee on April 20 and had his initial appearance that afternoon. He pleaded not guilty to all counts on May 25. His last status hearing was held on July 29.

  • Knowingly Entering or Remaining in any Restricted Building or Grounds Without Lawful Authority
  • Violent Entry and Disorderly Conduct on Capitol Grounds
Eric Torrens
Left: Torrens pictured inside the Capitol with Matthew Bledsoe Photo: U.S. Justice Dept.

Torrens was arraigned on March 12 where he pleaded not guilty to all counts. He was released on personal recognizance. His last status hearing was held on May 14.

  • Obstruction of an Official Proceeding and Aiding and Abetting; Entering and Remaining in a Restricted Building or Grounds
  • Disorderly and Disruptive Conduct in a Restricted Building or Grounds; Disorderly Conduct in a Capitol Building
  • Parading, Demonstrating, or Picketing in a Capitol Building

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