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‘Who am I?’ Athletes battle depression, anxiety with sports on pause

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NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WKRN) – May is mental health awareness month. It’s a great reminder to check in on your loved ones and seek help if you are hurting.

With the pandemic wreaking havoc on what we deem normal, the sense of uncertainty is affecting each and every one of us including athletes.

Athletes from every level are struggling right now with the inability to compete and perform, but it goes much deeper than that. There’s a serious mental health component to not just the uncertainty, but also losing a sense of worth.

Megan Moir, a therapist for athletes and a former athlete herself says the anxiety and depression is increasing in athletes during the pandemic.

“Sport has become not just a sense of purpose in their lives, but unfortunately it’s also a huge arena to get attention, to get love and to get belonging in their life,” said Moir. “So when your worth is tied to your performance and you’re no longer able to perform and you don’t know where else your worth comes from as as human being, where are you supposed to go?”

“That’s what’s causing a lot of the depression and anxiety because athletes are really having to look at themselves and say, “who am I what else do I have beside my sport?”

If you want to learn more about therapy in athletes head to Megan Moir’s website.

As always you can call this number for immediate help – 1-800-273-8255 (National Suicide Prevention Hotline)

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Aaron Nolan is a morning show co-host in Little Rock, Arkansas with Nexstar Media Group's KARK-TV. He has a passion for social media and makes it an important part of his daily routine. Click here to read Aaron's full bio.

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